CRUSADA to Study Alcohol Use Trajectories for Latino Immigrants

Mario De La Rosa, professor of social work and director of the Center for Research on U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)

Mario De La Rosa, professor of social work and director of the Center for Research on U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA)

Dr. Mariana Sanchez, postdoctoral associate at CRUSADA

Dr. Mariana Sanchez, postdoctoral associate at CRUSADA

Dr. Mario De La Rosa, Professor in the School of School Work at the FIU Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work and director of the Center for Research of U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA), and Dr. Mariana Sanchez, postdoctoral associate at CRUSADA, were awarded a five-year $1,630,000 grant to study the alcohol use trajectories of Latino immigrants during their first decade in the U.S.

Funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of the Director, Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research, the  study will expand on a previous investigation to examine how changes in social determinants interact with cultural factors to impact pre- to post-immigration alcohol use trajectories of early adult recent Latino immigrants during their first decade in the U.S. The original Recent Latino Immigrant Study was the first prospective community-based cohort study to examine the pre- to post-immigration alcohol use trajectories of young adult recent Latino immigrants during their first three years in the United States. The newly funded study will continue to follow this cohort of Latino immigrants through their 10 years in the U.S. The specific aims of this study are:

  • Examine how changes in pre- to post-immigration social determinants impact the alcohol use trajectories of early adult Latino immigrants.
  • Identify the impact of cultural factors on the alcohol use trajectories of early adult Latino immigrants.
  • Determine the moderating role of cultural factors on the relationship between changes in pre- to post-immigration social determinants and alcohol use trajectories among Latino immigrants during early adulthood.

According to De La Rosa, this work is essential as it will be the first of its kind to document alcohol use trajectories among Latino immigrants from pre-immigration through their first decade in the U.S. The study is positioned to fundamentally advance knowledge regarding sociocultural determinants that are antecedent to and perpetuate distinct alcohol use trajectories among recent Latino immigrants as they acculturate to the United States.

CRUSADA was established in 2003 to address the escalating twin epidemics of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS affecting Latino communities throughout South Florida. This pioneering, nationally and internationally recognized Center has received grant awards from several of the prestigious institutes within the NIH, including:

  • A National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) P20 Exploratory Center of Excellence grant titled The Center for Substance Use and HIV/AIDS Research on Latinos in the United States (C-SALUD; P20MD002288; PI: De La Rosa)
  • A National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) R01 grant titled The Intergenerational Transmission of Alcohol Use Among Latino Mothers and Daughters(R01NR012150; PI: De La Rosa)
  • A National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) R21 grant, collaboratively administered and investigated with Dr. Eduardo Romano, Pacific Institute For Research and Evaluation (PIRE). The grant is titled Drinking and Driving Among Recent Latino Immigrants (R21AA022202; PIs: De La Rosa, Romano)
  • A National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Endowment grant titled Florida International University-Health Disparities Initiative (FIU-HDI) 1S21MD010683-01: Dr. De La Rosa and Gil.

Author: William-Jose Velez

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